LCC’s 2nd OER Summit

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Image shared on Twitter by Eric Kunnen

On Friday, I was fortunate to have been able to attend the 2nd annual Lansing Community College Open Educational Resources Summit. I attended last year when David Wiley was the keynote and it was outstanding. This year’s keynote was Dr. Cable Green who is the Director of Open Education at Creative Commons. It was an amazing day of learning, sharing and making connections with others in the field I hadn’t known before.

For instance, as seen in this panel image which was the culminating event at the Summit, I learned about Joseph Mold who is the Director of Online Learning & Instructional Design at Bay College in our beautiful Michigan Upper Peninsula. The work they have been doing on behalf of student success and faculty autonomy with OER is one of the most compelling examples I have learned of to date. You can see a glimpse into some of their efforts and accomplishments in the two short videos below:

I nearly missed this year because it somehow was not on my radar. Fortunately, Regina Gong (Chair of this great Summit) mentioned this year’s summit over the weekend on Twitter. I wasn’t sure if I was going to be able to pull it off because of some previously scheduled meetings I had on my calendar, but thanks to my kind colleagues who covered for me, I was able to attend.

You can follow the active twitter stream that ensued here at #LCCOER or at #GoOpen. Don’t miss Eric Kunnen’s infamous note taking skills on his WordPress site too. It’s probably the next best thing to actually being there.

Looking forward to next year already! Thank you, Regina and all the great folks who helped put this together! 

Nomadic Designer Syndrome

Today, I have been boxing up my stuff. A few of us on the Learning Design team are running an experiment. We are clearing out our individual work spaces and opening them up for anyone to use. In turn, much of our time will be spent over in the new space renovated for the Hub.

Hello, my name is Dave and I have Nomadic Designer Syndrome.

I don’t know what that means because I just made it up.

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Hub Space being built in Wells Hall.

Today, I have been boxing up my stuff. A few of us on the Learning Design team are running an experiment. We are clearing out our individual work spaces and opening them up for anyone to use. In turn, much of our time will be spent over in the new space renovated for the Hub.

This new Hub space is in the D-Wing of Wells Hall on Michigan State’s campus directly east of the football stadium. Over the summer, the space has been gutted and transformed into an open office work environment. A substantial portion of the area is also designated for networking and collaboration with the intent of cultivating innovation.

img_6022This isn’t the first time I’ve made a transition to an open office environment. In one assignment, I shared an office with 9 other people. There were no cubicles. We all worked facing each other using standing desks. It was not easy at first for me to adjust. I was under an illusion that I would be more creative and productive in isolation, but the opposite ended up being true. In fact, having my colleagues all around me to bounce ideas off of all day was invigorating even for someone like me who is more naturally inclined to introversion. Sure, there were challenges we experienced, but we were able to build a culture around a code of conduct that worked for us as a team.

One thing is for sure.

Innovation is messy.

img_6023That’s why I’m most excited about the Hub’s approach inviting collaborators all around campus to co-work and innovate with us.

We open for business on Monday, October 10th. Please note that there will be lots of movement and noise, as we will still be moving in.. Who am I kidding? It is intended to be a loud and energetic space from day one. Please come on by and say hello. Better yet, consider setting up shop at one of our open workstations to connect, create opportunities and innovate with us.

We also have an open house on October 27th from 9am to 6pm. All are welcome to join.

Those of us involved in the Hub look forward to continued collaborations with you in learning and scholarship at Michigan State University.

Wiley on OER and Open Course Frameworks

In it, Wiley mentions that, “The biggest barriers to OER adoption are the time and effort it takes faculty to find resources, vet them for quality, and align them with course outcomes.”

Commons, Creative icon | Icon Search Engine | Iconfinder http://goo.gl/6DoMBThis recent post by David Wiley will be stirring a another good conversation with interesting links that I couldn’t resist sharing here:

 

  • Open Course Frameworks: Lowering the Barriers to OER Adoption | iterating toward openness http://goo.gl/j1B4y
In it, Wiley mentions that,
“The biggest barriers to OER adoption are the time and effort it takes faculty to find resources, vet them for quality, and align them with course outcomes.”
He asserts that Open Course Frameworks can help solve these problems by helping institutions adopt evidence-based approaches to using OER for eliminate textbook costs and improving student success.